1. Kevin Czajkowski
  2. https://www.utoledo.edu/llss/geography/facultystaff/deptfaculty/czajkowski.html
  3. Professor
  4. GLOBE Mission EARTH
  5. https://www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth
  6. University of Toledo
  1. Svetlana Darche
  2. https://www.wested.org/personnel/svetlana-darche/
  3. Director
  4. GLOBE Mission EARTH
  5. https://www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth
  6. WestEd
  1. Peter Garik
  2. http://www.bu.edu/sed/profile/peter-garik/
  3. Associate Professor
  4. GLOBE Mission EARTH
  5. https://www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth
  6. Boston University
  1. Sara Mierwiak
  2. Research Assistant
  3. GLOBE Mission EARTH
  4. https://www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth
  5. University of Toledo
  1. Tracy Ostrom
  2. Project Coordinator
  3. GLOBE Mission EARTH
  4. https://www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth
  5. University of California Berkeley
  1. Janet Struble
  2. Project Manager
  3. GLOBE Mission EARTH
  4. https://www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth
  5. The GLOBE Program
  1. Jessica Taylor
  2. Physical Scienitst
  3. GLOBE Mission EARTH
  4. https://www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth
  5. NASA
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: William Spitzer

    William Spitzer

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 07:53 a.m.

    It's great to see that GLOBE is still thriving, there are so few projects that have been able to be sustained for this long!

     

    I was curious about whether there are particular GLOBE measurements that have been most successful in getting students engaged and thinking about their own research questions, either locally or by looking at data from multiple sites.

  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 10:54 a.m.

    Thanks Bill, GLOBE is really doing well. It meets a lot of the goals of NGSS and it gets students thinking about how to design a project, collect data and analyze that data. There are several opportunities for students to present their research as well (virtually and in person). One of the first types of observations that students can take that is very interesting and easy to do is cloud observations. We also like the surface temperature protocol (partly because I developed it) but also students seem to really like it and can do research projects on impacts of land cover on temperature pretty easily. Kevin

     
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    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 10:57 a.m.

    Hi All,

    I wanted to invite you to take a look at our video. It is about our NASA funded GLOBE Mission EARTH project in which we try to get students to do authentic research projects. Through the STEM for All video Showcase we are hoping to learn more about how our project can be improved and how we can link students to authentic science. We also made this video as a way to share what we are doing as a way to advertise the program and students doing authentic research projects. Thanks, Kevin

  • Icon for: Grant Wilson

    Grant Wilson

    Project Director
    May 14, 2018 | 01:47 p.m.

    What an excellent and engaging program! I am working with K-1 teachers in a professional development program (NURTURES) that will be focused on Earth-Space (NGSS K DCI:Weather & Climate). Do you have experience in working with or using GLOBE with students that young? Do you think there are specific elements that would be good to introduce at this age?

  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 02:47 p.m.

    We have worked the K-2 teachers and students. I'm always amazed at what the students can do. Seasons is one of the topics the students have to study often. GLOBE fits with green down in the fall, snow in the winter and green up in the spring. There is also an aerosol protocol for younger students that has been used by several K-2 students for projects. They use sticky paper to collect the particles and relate them to things like kids playing on the playground or pollution from the street.

     
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    Julianne Mueller-Northcott
    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Marcy Seavey

    Marcy Seavey

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 14, 2018 | 08:11 p.m.

    I second Kevin's comments.  As a part of a year long PD project at the University of northern Iowa, our team worked with K-12th grade teachers.  One Kindergarten teacher was especially successful with using Elementary GLOBE and GLOBE materials with her students using the theme of seasons.  She began with the Elementary GLOBE Activity, the Color of Seasons, and a discussion of how to identify natural and man made items in their school grounds.  Rather than using crayons on paper, the students used digital cameras to take photographs of the color of our school grounds once a month.  Throughout the year, the class prepared a color of the seasons photo presentation.  They loved to look back on the past photos and that inspired them to look in the same places to see if the colors changed - without trying they established (and invented for themselves) photo points! This class also did some green up and down and some cloud identification. 

  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Communications Coordinator, GLOBE Implementation Office
    May 15, 2018 | 02:11 a.m.

    Grant, GLOBE takes a scaffolded approach to the teaching of Earth System Science and has something for everyone from K-12 and beyond. Check out the Elementary GLOBE webpage with a full list of resources, activities and storybooks for the Elementary school students you are working with at https://www.globe.gov/web/elementary-globe
    -----Also check out our GLOBE Student Experience video here in the Showcase at  http://stemforall2018.videohall.com/presentatio...

     
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    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Sara Mierzwiak

    Sara Mierzwiak

    Graduate Student
    May 14, 2018 | 02:08 p.m.

    Hi I'm Sara Mierzwiak, Research Assistant with GLOBE Mission EARTH and primary producer/editor for this video. Thank you for viewing our video! Since GLOBE is an international program that involves students around the world, I would like everyone who works with students to consider becoming involved in GLOBE. You can find out more about it at www.globe.gov, and you can read more about GLOBE Mission EARTH at www.globe.gov/web/mission-earth. If you or your students explore their local environment by collecting environmental data, they should become part of the GLOBE community! Their data could become part of the international GLOBE database and be available for use by others around the world - including NASA scientists! Feel free to ask me any questions about getting involved. 

  • Icon for: Donna Charlevoix

    Donna Charlevoix

    Program Director
    May 14, 2018 | 04:29 p.m.

    Hi Kevin! Great to see you continuing to do innovative things with GLOBE. Some of our EarthConnections project partners are aiming to connect to GLOBE. I’m curious about where you might be doing or have done teacher training. Any chance you’re working in the regions of Atlanta or San Bernardino, or Oklahoma broadly?

     
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    Ylliass LAWANI
  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 11:07 a.m.

    Hi Donna,

    It is good to hear from you. We don't have any trainings from my group in any of those locations. We are focused on Ohio/Michigan, Oakland, CA, New Mexico, Providence, RI, Tennessee and SW New Jersey. 

  • Small default profile

    Lin Chambers

    Funder
    May 21, 2018 | 11:06 a.m.

    Donna - There are active GLOBE Partners in Georgia and LA.  You or your partners might reach out to them to see what might be possible.  In Oklahoma I think there is some interest, but perhaps not so much activity right now.  Your group might be able to catalyze something.

     

  • Icon for: Claire Pillsbury

    Claire Pillsbury

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 08:29 p.m.

    Wonderful project and impressive to see the range of ages of students participating!   How much, how often do the students get to interact directly with the scientists?  It is terrific that they get access to real evidence/data and have the experience of using it to answer questions.  I wondered at what stage of the process they or their teachers might be checking in with the scientists in that area of research.  

     

     
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    Julianne Mueller-Northcott
  • Icon for: Marcy Seavey

    Marcy Seavey

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 15, 2018 | 09:51 a.m.

    Hi Claire, I'll let Kevin and his team answer for this project specifically.  I was the Iowa GLOBE Coordinator for 15 years and our students and teachers had frequent contact with scientists at many different levels.  

    The most common contact is via the GLOBE website.  Every GLOBE protocol was developed by a Scientist or team with feedback from educators.  A part of the protocols is an explanation of what that first team does with the data, what questions she is interested in answering with the data, and why the science is important.  Through the GLOBE Program Science Blog, facebook page, webinars and online community boards, the entire GLOBE community is kept up to date on what scientists are learning and how data collection champagnes are contributing to satellite and other missions.  These same tools and the student science fairs, research symposium, and learning expeditions allow students to share what they are learning with the scientists!

    But I've also found that when students at an individual school are collecting data and they run into trouble, have a question, or make an unusual discovery, the GLOBE Scientists and help desk respond to emails and community boards.  When lots of students and schools have the same questions, then the topic will show up in the blog or a webinar because for every group of students who reaches out, there are probably others who don't realize that they can/should. 

    For example, about 10 years ago I was working with 3 middle schools who were working together to collect MUC data for the land cover team.  They had a goal to collect at least 10 MUC site data sets for every landcover type in the county.  After 2 weeks of intensive daily evening collections, some of the students at just one school discovered that about 1/4 of their data points were mapped to the wrong places.  The students knew that they were NOT accidentally collecting data in the middle of a town 7.5 miles to the SE.  Members of the landcover team looked at the mapped data, they asked the students which points were "wrong" and where the data belonged.  The puzzle was confounded because some students HAD collected data in that town!  But pulling out the "wrong sites" and looking where the students said they had collected the data quickly revealed a pattern - all of sites were offset by the same distance and direction.  Two of that school's 8 GPS units were set to degrees and minutes rather than degrees and decimal degrees.  The data has all been entered as degrees and decimal degrees - offsetting just 1/4 of that school's data by exactly the same distance and direction for each point.  The students were able to use a little math to re-enter their location data and fix all of the data points.  I think this is an awesome example of how GLOBE teaches the collaborative nature of science - the students got to work together with the science team and help desk to figure out what was going on - it wasn't a case of the scientist swooping in and declaring "Your GSP units are not set up correctly!"  The students knew where they had collected the data and that something was wrong, the science team would never have known the data points were in the wrong places without the student observations and the students needed the science teams deeper knowledge of how GPS works.  It was a team effort to solve the mystery!

  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 11:14 a.m.

    Thanks Marcy, It is always good to hear from you. I can add that in GLOBE Mission EARTH we set up a Google Doc to help us keep track of all of the scientists and what they are doing with students. It turns out that scientists in our group do stuff with schools but don't let anyone know about it. I'm guilty of that too. Most of the interactions look to be one time visits to a school or answers to emails from students about their projects. But, there are cases with more in depth interaction with the scientist. Margaret Pippin at NASA Langley is working with GLOBE teachers and students on aerosols. She frequently works with the teachers and students, has web meetings, etc. The richness of her interaction with the teachers and students is evident in the quality of the research projects the students produce.

     
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    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Marcy Seavey

    Marcy Seavey

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 14, 2018 | 08:35 p.m.

    Hi Kevin and team!  

    It is so wonderful to see GLOBE Mission Earth in the showcase!  I still have so many fond memories of the GLOBEone student research teams preparing to present to "our scientists". 

    I have a million favorite things about GLOBE, but one is touched on in your video.  I think the most meaningful moment in a new GLOBE teacher and GLOBE student's experience happens in early data collection when they make an observation and it surprises them.  They say "that is weird" or "I wasn't expecting that" and instead of ignoring that curiosity, GLOBE supports them to investigate it - to take ownership of their own data and others to answer a question of interest to them.  To me that is the moment when the GLOBE experience becomes a authentic science experience - when the students go beyond contributing data and into doing their own investigations.  It is so exciting to see how far GLOBE has come in supporting these young scientists, especially through your project.  Thank you!

  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 11:20 a.m.

    Hi Marcy,

    How can we get you back into working with GLOBE? :)  You may be able to tell that a lot of the concepts we use were started at GLOBEone: students presenting projects, doing protocol investigations at the conference, having scientists interact with the students. I don't know if you remember but I had my oldest son Robby video tape the event. He might have been 7. This summer he will be doing an internship at NASA Marshall. I've very proud of him. 

  • Icon for: Marcy Seavey

    Marcy Seavey

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 15, 2018 | 01:59 p.m.

    Congratulations to Robby!  I do remember his video taping and the visit we had with you and the boys and Carol Boyce at the Waterloo Arboretum a few years back.  You gave us a look at one of your new temperature cameras. 

    GLOBE is still near and dear to my heart and I'm still occasionally presenting a conference session on citizen science in the classroom which (obviously) features GLOBE and stories from Iowa schools. 

    I'm also taking the collaboration, networking, and grant writing skills that I developed working with GLOBE to work with faculty all across our campus on STEM related projects, like the project that got me looking into this year's Showcase videos - Teaching Mathematics to Struggling Learners (video at: http://videohall.com/p/1211) by the University of Northern Iowa Center for teaching and Learning Mathematics.  If the conference had been 2 weeks late this year, I would have participated as my vacation.  We are piloting a new 8 week high school summer research apprentice program and I couldn't be gone while the apprentices are on campus.

  • Icon for: Julianne Mueller-Northcott

    Julianne Mueller-Northcott

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 12:40 p.m.

    Wow! So neat to see examples of the GLOBE project. I think what I was most impressed with in your video was the scientific communication skills that were being developed in students. To get students to that final step of presenting their research, with some amazing science posters, is a huge task! What were some of the strategies that teachers used to get students to that final product? What were some of the challenges they encountered?

     
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    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 03:58 p.m.

    This is a good question that we are looking at. One of the biggest challenges seems to be the teacher's own confidence in themselves and/or their students' abilities. The teachers often don't think they have enough time to get kids to finish a project and present it. We have many teachers who have students take GLOBE observations and do activities but they never do the next step of completing a project and presenting it. One of the things we would like to learn from our teachers that are successful in having their students compete projects and present them is how they do it. There are other challenges that the students run into. Sometimes one student in a group holds an important part of the project and then they are absent. Or, some how students' posters are left behind at the school, i.e. logistical issues in a way.

     
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    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Senior Director of Communications
    May 15, 2018 | 10:38 p.m.

    I really like the virtual symposium idea. It was great to see that kids can present their results just the way professionals do at a conference, and disseminate their findings this way.

  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 12:52 p.m.

    Presenting like professionals was a big goal of GLOBE. It separates what we do from traditional science fairs. The GLOBE Program offers regional symposia. At the University of Toledo, we have a symposium, we call the SATELLITES Conference in which students present and then go on to present at the midwest regional GLOBE symposium. 

  • Icon for: Sujata Shetty

    Sujata Shetty

    Associate Professor
    May 16, 2018 | 11:09 a.m.

    Kevin and team, congratulations on this wonderful work!  I was very taken by one of the teachers' comments about her students, "They're inspired.  They're changed."  It occurs to me that this experience not only makes the student participants better scientists, (important as that is), but can also lead them to think more critically about their own lives and communities.

  • Icon for: Danielle Espino

    Danielle Espino

    IC4 Project Manager
    May 16, 2018 | 12:22 p.m.

    What an excellent project aiming to increase interest and diversity in this field.  With so much global participation, what kinds of challenges do you run into with oversight? How big is the team that manages the project? Kudos to the project team for giving students the opportunity to gain hands on experience in science research. No doubt this has (as the video alluded) sparked those moments of curious to inspire in so many

  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 12:49 p.m.

    Thanks for your comment Danielle. The project is kind of big and kind of small. We have parallel activities going on at 7 locations: University of Toledo, Boston University, Tennessee State University, Palmyra Cove Discovery Center in NJ, UC Berkeley/WestEd, Dept. Education New Mexico and NASA Langley. Each partner works with teachers and students in their area. The University of Toledo (UT) manages all the partners in the entire group and we work with teachers and students in Ohio and Michigan. I am the PI of the entire project and there is an education and an engineering professors that help out in their specializations. We have a project manager at UT who we call the miracle worker. She does amazing things organizing the entire group plus the parts at UT. We have a part time person at UT that does the evaluation with our Ohio/Michigan teachers and students and we have 2 graduate students, one in education and one in Geography. For what each partner does, we are quite lean. The video was made by the education grad student. 

  • May 19, 2018 | 02:34 p.m.

    What a wonderful project!  It is great that is a partnership across some many institutions and so many places across the country. Keep up the good work.

  • Icon for: Kevin Czajkowski

    Kevin Czajkowski

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2018 | 10:56 a.m.

    Thanks Rebeeca,

    We just had the GLOBE midwest regional student symposium in Detroit this past weekend. It was great to see the students research projects. Hopefully, we are changing students' lives.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.