1. Jan Heiderer
  2. Communications Coordinator, GLOBE Implementation Office
  3. The GLOBE Program Annual Meeting- Student Field Experience
  4. www.globe.gov
  5. University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
  1. Tony Murphy
  2. Director, GLOBE Implementation Office
  3. The GLOBE Program Annual Meeting- Student Field Experience
  4. www.globe.gov
  5. University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 12:26 a.m.

    Hi, I’m Jan Heiderer, Communications Coordinator for The GLOBE Program, an international science and education program that involves students, teachers, scientists and citizen scientists in 120 countries. The students in this video are from Croatia, Japan, Mongolia, Oman, Taiwan, Thailand and the United States.

    GLOBE Is sponsored by NASA and supported by NSF, NOAA and the US Dept. of State and based at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, I’ll be here this week along with Dr. Tony Murphy, Director of the GLOBE Implementation Office, to answer any questions you may have about our video and about The GLOBE Program in general. For more than 20 years, GLOBE has been encouraging students to play an active role in adding to our global awareness of our home planet and to contribute meaningfully to our understanding of the Earth system, through data collection and collaborative research. Our aim is to help prepare students for the future by developing in them a life-long love of science and a commitment to life-long care of the Earth. We hope you like our video filmed in Rocky Mountain National Park during our Annual Meeting in 2016. In July we'll be filming again at our biggest student event ever, at Killarney National Park, in Ireland!

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Ylliass LAWANI
    Julianne Mueller-Northcott
  • Icon for: William Spitzer

    William Spitzer

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 09:19 a.m.

    This looks like such a wonderful experience for students from around the world to come together in such a beautiful place. 

    I was curious about how "science was the language" that brought these students together across differences of language and culture. Were there specific strategies that you found effective to bridge these kinds of differences? How did global issues, such as climate change (and the varying national responses to it), play a role as students negotiated these differences?

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Julianne Mueller-Northcott
  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 01:59 a.m.

    Hello Bill. The students in this video came from Croatia, Japan, Mongolia, Oman, Taiwan, Thailand and the United States. Not all the students were fluent in English… a few of them seemed eager to participate but then on camera they struggled with the language. It occurred to us that our strategy should be to encourage them to speak in their own languages and it made a difference immediately! The students really opened up when they could fully express themselves. Teachers were there to help translate.
    -----When the American student Isaac said,” We’re speaking the same language, which is science...” he hit the nail on the head. The science protocols and activities in the field became their common language. It was the bond that brought them together. Because these students share a common interest in, and knowledge about GLOBE’s approach to Earth Science, they were constantly chatting about issues in their communities and sharing information about how they were applying what they were learning to finding solutions.
    -----We’re really looking forward to the GLOBE Learning Expedition, in Ireland in July, where we’ll be hosting students from 40 countries!  ~janH

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    William Spitzer
    Claire Pillsbury
  • Icon for: Marcy Seavey

    Marcy Seavey

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 14, 2018 | 10:11 a.m.

    Having served as Iowa's GLOBE Coordinator for 15 years, I have been able to experience first hand the life long impact the program has no students, teachers, and scientists from around the world.  To learn science by doing science is good educational practice.  GLOBE, through Student symposiums and conferences does even more - it welcomes this new generation of sciences into the community from their first contributions. Thanks GLOBE for leading the way in citizen science!

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Claire Pillsbury
    Julianne Mueller-Northcott
  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 02:29 a.m.

    Thanks Marcy, GLOBE wouldn't be where it is today without energetic teachers like you. You are right about the great wealth of resources that GLOBE has to share, from the free and downloadable Teachers Guide <https://www.globe.gov/web/elementary-globe/over...
    and story books to the many opportunities to meet face to face in professional development workshops, the annual meetings and the once-every three-or-four-years global gathering, the GLOBE Learning Expedition. The meetings really seem to cement the community and inspire people to work collaboratively on inventive US and international projects. Everyone thrives on collaboration.. and teachers really appreciate the support of other teachers.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Marcy Seavey
  • May 14, 2018 | 11:12 a.m.

    Great video Jan, I love how it shows the international nature of GLOBE. Isaac did a great job of summing it up at the end. Of course, it is great to see my own kids enjoying themselves in the video. We posted a video about the projects presented with help from GLOBE Mission EARTH here: http://videohall.com/p/1312   Kevin

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 02:02 a.m.

    hi Kevin, I like your video too! you included some really nice footage of your students speaking up. It's so great to see how the GLOBE community is growing like crazy right now. 

  • Icon for: Julianne Mueller-Northcott

    Julianne Mueller-Northcott

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 11:23 a.m.

    As a classroom teacher, having heard about the GLOBE program in the past--this video did an incredible job showcasing what an unique opportunity it presents for students. I love the idea of gathering students from around the world for a common purpose related to science. I, too, was struck by the "common language of science" student quote. What are avenues for teachers and students to get involved?

  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 11:57 p.m.

    Julianne... for teachers here's a good place to start. Learn the benefits, get trained:
    https://www.globe.gov/get-trained at workshop near you. OR take online etraining.. the links ishere: https://www.globe.gov/get-trained/protocol-etra...
    subscribe to our newsetter: https://www.globe.gov/join/opt-in
    Pair up with a project collaborator: https://www.globe.gov/globe-community/find-a-co...
    Learn about our special meetings and events, in the US and internationally: https://www.globe.gov/news-events/meetings_symp...
    Just do it! learn how to become involved: https://www.globe.gov/do-globe
    for STUDENTS..
    We have an online international Virtual Science Symposium every year in the spring. Read about it here: https://www.globe.gov/news-events/globe-events/...
    Just cruise the website. You'll get a lot of ideas at www.globe.gov

     

  • Icon for: Claire Pillsbury

    Claire Pillsbury

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 01:29 p.m.

    Wow - I think this video does a terrific job of conveying the essence of the program -  by having the youth speak directly about their experience and in their own words.  That science is an international cooperative and collaborative effort is often stated but normally youth don't have a chance to experience this for themselves as well as the conviviality that can be part of that collaborative work.  Kudos to the project team and all the participating youth.

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 12:17 a.m.

    Thank you Claire. I've noticed, in this showcase, that the videos I like best are the ones that tell the story of impactful projects or programs through the words of the students themselves. It's more powerful to hear students tell their own stories, rather than to be told about students. At GLOBE we impart the tools to explore the natural world, through keen observation and data collection, but we are coming to see too that the ability to talk about the research, to share it and to convincingly convey the value of it, is every bit as important as the research itself. That's why this year, at our GLOBE Learning Expedition in Ireland, we are bringing in a team of professional storytellers from Dublin, who will help students discover the art of storytelling. We're excited to introduce this element into our event (with hundreds of students from approximately 40 countries!) in July. We have reached capacity.. all sold out!.. but you might want to learn more about what is in store ...to be alert to the next one, by reading about it here: https://www.globe.gov/news-events/meetings_symp...

  • Icon for: William Swift

    William Swift

    Coordinating Producer. PBS NewsHour STEM and Health Student Reporting Labs
    May 15, 2018 | 10:12 p.m.

    Great program Jan, what a wonderful collaboration.  I took the Experiment in International Living to learn French and you ended up with a similarly bonded group of people all brought together by that common bond of Language study.  Bringing youth together, particularly in Colorado is a wonderful experience so different than what most of these students experience in their everyday approach to STEM/Science and the wonders of the world around you.  I also wend to Colorado College, so know about how enjoyable field science can be in that target rich environment.

    How do the Globe students get selected?  You have such great diversity it's pretty amazing, but plane tickets can't be cheap.  I see that this video was from the Annual meeting in Colorado, how do classes or Globe groups interact over the rest of the year or is it focused around the Annual Meeting?

    Fostering a love for different cultures and beliefs while studying science in the great outdoors is a pretty great way to spend a day in Colorado.  Great work.

     

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 12:30 a.m.

    Hi William thanks for your supportive comments! The students pay their own ways to these events... but schools often find ways to fundraise to help support a team. No the plane tickets are not cheap but registrations which include all activities and a majority of meals, are very reasonable. We may reserve a few spots for students, teachers, scientists, and partners so to get a good diversity of participants but overall the opportunity to attend the annual meeting, which includes the Student Research Experience and field experiences (like the one in this film) or the GLOBE Learning Expedition (like the one in Ireland this summer) are just first come first served. Often it is at these events that students find like-minded students to collaborate with over the next school year. We also have an online International Virtual Science Symposium every year and, in the US, regional science symposia across the country. (https://www.globe.gov/web/united-states-of-amer...).
    Some schools have created GLOBE Clubs, for after-school activities like taking care of weather stations they have built on their school yards. There are always new and exciting things happening in the GLOBE community.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Marcy Seavey
  • Icon for: Tony Murphy

    Tony Murphy

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 12:47 a.m.

    Thanks William, I work with Jan at the GLOBE Implementation Office.  The GLOBE students that attend our annual meeting are selected by the country coordinators of GLOBE in specific countries.  We don't select the students for meetings.  However we have created an experience for students during our annual meeting, during which they use GLOBE protocols and learn from each other as well.  The students may end up working with each other on GLOBE research projects in the future.  In fact, after the a GLOBE Learning Expedition in India in 2014, a group of students created a video about students doing community service and was entered into a White House STEM Video competition.  Students can remain friends and do research for a number of years. 

    Thank you for your comments and your great interest in the program  If you have any other questions, feel free to connect with us.   

  • Icon for: Marcy Seavey

    Marcy Seavey

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 16, 2018 | 09:27 a.m.

    Hi William, another aspect of GLOBE is that there is an entire network of GLOBE Coordinators and facilitators in addition to the Scientists, Implementation Office, Teachers and Students.  Coordinators may serve an entire country, a state, or a smaller region.  I served as the GLOBE Coordinator for the Iowa Academy of Science for 15 years.  Our partnership worked to provide additional opportunities for our teachers and students.  Here is a list of some of the opportunities our partnership offered to Iowa teachers and students:

    • 1-2 week basic GLOBE workshops
    • 1-3 day advanced workshops limited to a specific GLOBE protocol area
    • refresher workshops on data entry and site selection,
    • school visits to set up sites
    • school visits so that students could present their research to members of our team.
    • invited GLOBE teachers to present their GLOBE experiences to their peers at the Iowa Science Teaching Annual Conference. 
    • invited students  and student/teacher teams to present at our Iowa Academy of Science Annual Meeting. 
    • in partnership with the University of Northern Iowa, we invited GLOBE schools to present at the UNI Showcase on Technology (later Showcase on STEM), where 1 teacher and 5 students presented an exhibit and a 10-20 min presentation to the Universities preservice educators.
    • invited schools to present projects to our training team from their classroom through the Iowa Communication network and later Adobe Connect and Zoom.

    Of course not all of these opportunities happened every year.  Each partnership has different resources at different times.  Some work within their state departments of education, others at Universities or non-profits.

    Some teachers and schools take on the communication role on their own and partner with a sister school (maybe in the same city or maybe in two different countries) to communicate back and forth.

    GLOBE is more than a program, it is a community!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jennifer Bourgeault
  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Senior Director of Communications
    May 15, 2018 | 10:29 p.m.

    Thank you for your video and for your work with these students. It gives me hope for humanity and for our planet! I appreciated how these students are learning not just science skills, but also leadership and collaboration skills--and connecting across cultures through an immersive outdoor experience and research goals.

  • Icon for: Tony Murphy

    Tony Murphy

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 12:22 a.m.

    Miyoko, yes GLOBE is a wonderful program that brings together students, teachers, scientists and now citizen scientists together to help understand their local and global environment.  The power of the program is the ability to connect across countries both virtually and in person.   The new experience of bringing students together during the annual meeting lays the groundwork for hopefully future collaborations between the students and should they become STEM professionals these connections might remain.  

  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Senior Director of Communications
    May 16, 2018 | 07:02 a.m.

    That's great, Tony. How does the "virtual" component work? Are they the same students who ultimately meet each other in person, or do some students work together virtually without ever traveling?

  • Icon for: Tony Murphy

    Tony Murphy

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 08:20 p.m.

    The virtual component for the program is open to all students across the program.  The face-to-face meetings are also open to all students but all costs are generally covered by them to attend.  We do however, offer a small stipend to some students who have submitted projects to the International Virtual Science Symposium.  

    So students may never meet each other in person but can communicate with each other in numerous ways.

  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 12:36 a.m.

    Hello Miyoko, I see you are an ornithologist! You might find these GLOBE resources to be of interest:https://www.globe.gov/web/elementary-globe/over...
    The Hummingbird Project: https://www.globe.gov/documents/356823/2538681/...

  • Icon for: Leah Clapman

    Leah Clapman

    Managing Editor, Education
    May 16, 2018 | 10:55 a.m.

    Love this discussion. Students have such a different experience when they approach a complex and beautiful location like a National Park. We have a site devoted to it

    https://studentreportinglabs.org/americathebeau...

     

  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 02:10 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing the link Leah. Glad to know about this now. The student experience that our video portrays, held in Rocky Mt National Park, was special because it took place during the 100th anniversary year of the National Parks and there were a lot of special resources around that that we could point our students to. The theme of our big event in Ireland this year has, for its theme, Developing a Sense of Place: Mountains, Woods and Wate . We value helping students to develop that sense of place by imparting some knowledge of the geoplogy, geography and history of the area, its flora and fauna, history and legends because in doing so we enhance environmental literacy and stewardship. It's an important part of our mission!

  • May 17, 2018 | 10:50 a.m.

    Wonderful to see all of the international faces.  Can you say more about how the students collaborate across borders on science during the year?  Are there synchronous, virtual opportunities?  or asynchronous data analysis activites?

     

    Thanks.

  • Icon for: Tony Murphy

    Tony Murphy

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2018 | 04:30 p.m.

    Hi Cathryn, the students select whether they want to collaborate or not with other students.  We do facilitate such collaboration through our system.  We organize the International Virtual Science Symposium (https://www.globe.gov/do-globe/for-students/stu...) where students can post their research for feedback from our GLOBE International STEM Network (https://www.globe.gov/web/globe-international-s...)

    We have already created a set of data analysis learning activities for teachers that can be used to hone skills in this area.  Teachers could help students with their data analysis.   

    (https://www.globe.gov/news-events/globe-news/ne...)

     

    Students here in the US can present their research at Student Research Symposia in the 6 GLOBE US Regions.  https://www.globe.gov/web/united-states-of-amer...

    About eery 4 years, we host a GLOBE Learning Expedition, where students from around the world come together to present GLOBE research to their peers and scientists.  (https://www.globe.gov/news-events/meetings_symp...)

    The next one is this summer in Ireland.

    If you have any questions, feel free to contact us

     

  • Icon for: Ylliass LAWANI

    Ylliass LAWANI

    Researcher
    May 18, 2018 | 01:30 a.m.

    I noticed (as always) that this wonderful video is full of Smiling faces, generosity, ingenuity, friendship that transcends boundaries and cultures, tolerance, and a lot of hope. All this, Happiness by Sciences, is possible…All this is GLOBE :-).

    Thanks for this magic that has lasted 23 years. Thanks you for continuing to create and nurture enthusiasm and LIFE through science for several generations of students around the world.

  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Lead Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 07:40 p.m.

    Thanks for your comments Ylliass. Great to hear from you.

  • Icon for: Tony Murphy

    Tony Murphy

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 08:01 p.m.

    Thanks Ylliass for your words.  It is wonderful to see the impact that the program has had on you as a student and now the impact you are having on it as an alum, assistant Country Coordinator for Benin, and now a Working Group member.

     

  • Icon for: Craig Strang

    Craig Strang

    Informal Educator
    May 18, 2018 | 05:33 a.m.

    This is a great video and a great project. Thanks for this inspiring work. I'm curious about the science learning that takes place. Often citizen science programs focus on data collection but the students aren't involved in designing the investigations, asking their own questions or formulating explanations. In GLOBE, how do balance the need to contribute to ongoing research projects with the need to engage in science learning in the field?

  • Icon for: Tony Murphy

    Tony Murphy

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 08:00 p.m.

    Hi Craig, Thanks for the kind words about the video. It really does show the powerful impact of the program.  GLOBE at its essence is the combination of science and education and it was this way from its inception.  Over the years and as the database has grown the emphasis in the program on student using their data and others for research has increased.  We now have an International Virtual Science Symposium in which students need to enter data into the system, use them in their research, in order to submit their project as part of the symposium.  This is the same requirement for the US Student Research Symposia that have been organized for the last 3 years.  In this way students see the use of the data that they collect and enter, and some even do research that compares data across schools.  It really is a nice balance.  Students can load their final projects here: https://www.globe.gov/do-globe/for-students/stu...

     

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.