1. Margaret Baguio
  2. http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/info/baguio.html
  3. Program Manager - Education and Outreach
  4. STEM Enhancement in Earth Science
  5. http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/sees-internship/
  6. University of Texas at Austin, Texas Space Grant Consortium
  1. Wallace Fowler
  2. Professor Emeritus
  3. STEM Enhancement in Earth Science
  4. http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/sees-internship/
  5. Texas Space Grant Consortium
  1. Tim Urban
  2. Director
  3. STEM Enhancement in Earth Science
  4. http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/sees-internship/
  5. University of Texas at Austin
Public
Choice
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 08:42 a.m.

    The STEM Enhancement in Earth Science high school internship is an engaging, authentic research experience for high school students.  This video shares what the experience meant to previous students involved in the project.   How do you think high school experiences such as SEES help students prepare for STEM careers?  What is the value of an internship for high school students?

  • May 14, 2018 | 12:06 p.m.

    I thought it was interesting that one of the students said that her future has been rewritten. This seems like an amazing opportunity for students. Are you able to follow students after they go to college to see what jobs they get or careers they pursue? Your program may not have been in place that long though. Kevin

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 02:32 p.m.

    Yes, students do keep in touch with us after completing the program.  We have students attending MIT, Stanford, Pepperdine, University of Texas at Austin, etc.  This is the third year that we have had the nationwide SEES internship.  One of our interns will be doing a NASA internship this summer analyzing data from the Cassini mission to Saturn.  Previously, area students assisted scientists in conducting research.  We have students that participated that are NASA contractors and Facebook employees.

  • May 14, 2018 | 02:54 p.m.

    Great. I hope you are funded for many years to come. It will be interesting to see where they end up career wise. 

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 10:07 p.m.

    Thank you!  We are constantly amazed by these hard-working, inspiring young people.

  • Icon for: Jamie Bell

    Jamie Bell

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 05:45 p.m.

    Thank you for this inspiring video. Following on some of the comments/questions above, are systemtic  longitudinal studies an aspiration of the program? The students seem to appreciate the authenticity of these experiences. Do some report an enhanced appreciation for STEM but not necessarily an academic trajectory, and would you also consider that a good outcome?

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 10:12 p.m.

    Our longitudinal studies are designed to track the college degrees and careers of the participants in the program.  It is our hope to build the STEM pipeline.  Student participants are sophomores or juniors in high school.  We found from earlier experience that if a student is in their senior year they have selected a career path and have usually been accepted into college.  Scientists are asked to provide letters of recommendation when students are applying for college, when they apply for intern opportunities during their college careers, and hopefully we will see the benefits of their education on careers.

  • Icon for: Kalie Sacco

    Kalie Sacco

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 06:46 p.m.

    Margaret, thank you for sharing this remarkable project! I loved seeing how engaged and passionate the students are, and from reading your other comments, it sounds like many of them have gone on to prestigious institutions and careers. Can you talk about how students are recruited to participate? I am especially interested to know if students come in to the program as high achievers in STEM, and/or if there are active strategies to recruit students who might not have access to STEM opportunities.

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 10:21 p.m.

    We advertise the SEES internship through the NASA Express News, at educator conferences, and a STEM activities and events.  The application packet includes answers to essay questions, grades, a letter of recommendation, and an introduction video.  Each application is reviewed by multiple judges.  It was a concern after year one that the student participants were probably going to major in STEM anyway.  In year 2, we added several questions to the application that would allow for students that may not have STEM opportunities currently but would greatly benefit from the program.  Questions such as:  Does your high school offer AP or IB programs, is their a university within 30 miles of where you live, is there a library in your community, etc.  We also added an area for STEM benefit by participating in the program.  We had a student participant last year that was homeless, another that was a child of migrant farmers having moved 7 times in one year.  I am pleased to say that they have both been admitted into world class universities and will major in STEM.  The young lady that produced this video actually attended a fine arts high school.  She loved film but had a passion for STEM.  After participating in the SEES internship, she is now majoring in Aerospace Engineering and minoring in film.  I am inspired by their stories.

     
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    Jillian Conry
  • Icon for: Preeti Gupta

    Preeti Gupta

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 02:07 p.m.

    Wow, great program! I am also interested in the longitudinal tracking aspect of this. In a similar project that we have here at the American Museum of Natural History, we saw good results in getting into college, but we didn't have see that the kids completed with STEM degree. We discovered a lot of the same choke points that literature tells us about (gate keeper classes, etc). We have a study underway that digs deeper into the pathways of youth so we can learn about when and how students succeed, when they do, and what are the ways these students are dealing with the choke points. We are particularly interested in their networks - the people they call as part of their network who might be supportive of them. 

     

    Thank you also for sharing how you do the application process. I learned from that. How many applicants are you getting and how many spots do you have? Are you facing capacity issues? What incentives do you give the scientists and engineers for doing this?

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 03:01 p.m.

    We certainly underestimated the interest that students would have in this program.  We had almost 500 applications for the 46 who will be onsite this summer.  The science team wants to make sure that students have an authentic experience so we keep the groups small and the experience huge.  We have a variety of scientists participating -- some are NASA subject matter experts who are engaging students as part of their ongoing work, some are retired NASA professionals and faculty members who give their time and talents, and some are scientists or graduate students who receive minimal financial support.  After testing last year with one project, this year we are adding "remote" scientists.  For example, the scientists may be at NASA Johnson Space Center but uses "zoom" or Skype to work with their team of students each afternoon.  We have a teacher extern who is in the group with the student as they connect remotely with their scientist.  

    We are currently working with NASA on protocols where we can engage the students that were not selected to the on-site internships as "remote" interns.

    Thanks for the great questions!  

  • Icon for: Kalie Sacco

    Kalie Sacco

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 06:21 p.m.

    Wow, that is an amazing response rate! It's great that you have a wide range of NASA professionals involved, too. On the flipside of my first question about student participation, I'm wondering how you have recruited NASA staff to participate. Have you found any outreach strategies to be particularly helpful?

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 10:36 p.m.

    We use a variety of methods and each has added to the success.  We are located at The University of Texas Center for Space Research where we have over 50 researchers analyzing NASA satellite data.  We have numerous NASA employees who are alumni of the university and stay connected to faculty here.  We also have educators that have participated in professional development that we host as well as undergraduate and graduate students who have received internships and fellowships for the space grant consortium.  Add to that the willingness of NASA employees to encourage the next generation of explorers provides a winning combination. 

  • Icon for: Jamie Bell

    Jamie Bell

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 06:18 p.m.

    Thank you for these helpful, fascinating details Margaret. I was also wondering also about the interactions and relationships between the scientists and the high school students, as in my experience programs that have success with these dimensions often go through learning processes around matching, mentoring, etc. Looks like this is multi dimensional program with a variety of opportunities for youth to interact with researchers and graduate students?

     

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 10:40 p.m.

    We utilize a variety of methods to "match" students to their project mentor - project selection, previous STEM skills the student brings to the project, and interest in a field of study.  The relationships are built during the 30 hours the students work remotely with their project mentor and team prior to the two week on-site internship.  The students ask project mentors and scientists for letters of recommendation when applying for college and for internships.  When working with graduate students they get a feel for what it is like to be in college and conducting research.

  • May 15, 2018 | 08:16 p.m.

    I feature SEES on the bulletin board outside my physics classroom! How does your program remain sustainable?

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 10:43 p.m.

    This program is currently funded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.  When grant funds end our plan is to continue the program at our research institution but it may be on a more localized level.  We will also share best practices with the National Space Grant consortia members.  

  • Icon for: Jan Heiderer

    Jan Heiderer

    Communications Coordinator, GLOBE Implementation Office
    May 16, 2018 | 01:01 a.m.

    Wonderful video Margaret! loved it! I am so pleased to learn more about the experience that was given to our GLOBE student a couple of years back (or was it just last year?) and to another who will participate this summer. The kids speak with such depth of feeling. This is what makes your video great. I really like your soundtrack too.

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 09:52 a.m.

    We are also excited about the GLOBE students joining our program.  This year he is from Alaska.  It should be a true Texas experience for him.  We are in the planning stages now of inviting those not selected for the on-site internship to participate with us on the Mosquito Habitat Mapper project.  It should be exciting to collect data from across the nation!

    I can take no credit for the kids, the video, or the soundtrack.  Hanna came up with the questions and asked students and researchers to respond.  She did the storyboard, put the video together, and the soundtrack.  She is quite the talented young lady.  I, too, hear the passion in these student voices.  Makes me proud!!!

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jillian Conry
  • Icon for: Preeti Gupta

    Preeti Gupta

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2018 | 07:31 p.m.

    Thank you for your responses Margaret! I am excited that you are thinking of remote mentors. In my work at the American Museum of Natural History, we run a consortium of science research mentoring programs with a similar model to you. We do a half day scientist PD to help you think about the facets of mentoring, working with urban youth, and giving them strategies to support youth in delivering work and meeting deadlines. We feel that this is not enough time and have a long list of topics we want to add. On the top of that list is supporting mentors in thinking of culturally competent strategies for working and supporting youth. Do you have a mentor PD? 

     

    Here is the link to our website for the consortium by the way. We are about to re-design, but it will give you an idea. It is studentresearchnyc.org

     

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2018 | 11:03 a.m.

    Your program sounds very interesting and engaging.  We do provide training to our project mentors but on a more informal basis.  Our university also has strict requirements regarding working with minors and each mentor takes an on-line class.  NASA has resources for subject matter experts working with various audiences.  I will definitely check out your website.  Thanks for sharing!  

    What do you find as the biggest obstacle for project mentors and scientists?

     

  • Small default profile

    Christy Wood

    K-12 Teacher
    May 17, 2018 | 11:26 a.m.

    Hanna, great job! You captured the heart of what SEES is all about! Adding comments from other interns added the personal touch that was needed! Nice job!

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2018 | 04:23 p.m.

    She is a talented young lady.

  • Icon for: Jamie Bell

    Jamie Bell

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2018 | 01:52 p.m.

    Thanks for the great questions  All, and Margaret for your thorough responses. Viewing the video a few time now made me curious about what you are learning and specific topic areas or disciplines that you may be noticing that the interns are drawn to and are persevering with over time. Any insights to share?

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2018 | 04:28 p.m.

    We have students rank their top three choices for a project on which they would like to work.  We had a large number of applicants this year for the Aerospace Engineering project.  While we cannot accommodate all requests for first choice, we do try to give them their 2nd or 3rd choice.  I think students that are environmentally sensitive choose Emergency Preparedness, Flood Response, ICESat, or GRACE.  Students that think they want to major in engineering usually choose Aerospace.  We did have a former intern who told me she majored in Computer Science because of the experience and success she had coding during her internship.  We try to give all students a variety of engineering projects and experiential activities.

  • Icon for: Jillian Conry

    Jillian Conry

    Graduate Student
    May 18, 2018 | 11:18 a.m.

    What an exciting opportunity for high-school students! Thank you for sharing this engaging student-created film. I appreciate that you recruit students with diverse interests and backgrounds and follow them to track proximal and distal outcomes. I am curious to know what inspired the idea of the SEES summer intern program and when it started. Also, if relevant, how has the program changed since its conception?

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 11:27 a.m.

    Several years ago scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin's Center for Space Research were seeking engaging methods to support Education and Outreach in their NASA supported research.  We decided to invite local area high school students and teachers to UT/CSR to work for six weeks with the scientists and engineers on their research.  They worked for 4 days per week during the day, it was not a residential program.  Because the program was successful to all -- teachers, students, and researchers -- we decided to apply for funds to take the program to a national audience.  We received funding and this will be the third year of the nationwide SEES internship.  We have added projects with scientists and engineers at NASA centers, not just UT/CSR.  Due to budgetary and time constraints, now students conduct 60 hours of remote work prior to coming to UT and then spend two weeks working on their project.

  • Small default profile

    Angela Groves

    K-12 Teacher
    May 21, 2018 | 02:07 p.m.

    And this is why I stalk Margaret’s PD offerings for Teachers ! 

    Innovative and So inspiring .

     

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    May 21, 2018 | 02:53 p.m.

    We love working with teachers and students!

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