1. Chih-Che Tai
  2. Asst Director/ Assc Prof
  3. STEM and LIteraCy in Education (SLICE)
  4. East Tennessee State University
  1. Reba Bailey
  2. Assistant Director of Schools
  3. STEM and LIteraCy in Education (SLICE)
  4. Hawkins County Schools
  1. Karin Keith
  2. https://works.bepress.com/karin-keith/
  3. Associate Professor & Department Chair
  4. STEM and LIteraCy in Education (SLICE)
  5. East Tennessee State University
  1. Scott Lamie
  2. Teacher
  3. STEM and LIteraCy in Education (SLICE)
  4. Bristol City Schools
  1. Steve Starnes
  2. Director of Schools
  3. STEM and LIteraCy in Education (SLICE)
  4. Hawkins County Schools
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2018 | 10:23 p.m.

    Thank you for watching our video about STEM and LIteraCy in Education (SLICE). We would love to hear your ideas about  STEM and Literacy integration. Please share your thoughts, comments, and questions with us. Your comments will be great resources and inspirations to move our mutual interests in STEM education forward!

  • Icon for: Margo Murphy

    Margo Murphy

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 05:49 a.m.

    The integration of science, story telling, and understanding various aspects of where you live in your project is very motivating to students.  I have two questions....  1.  how much support do teachers get to work with and understand the data they collect because I imagine this is an important element in their documentaries.  2. How is student work shared?  Who is the audience?  is it school based sharing or regional?  do students have an opportunity to interact?  Like this video showcase?  

    I would love to hear some of the details of impact your project has had.  

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Chih-Che Tai
  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 02:33 p.m.

    Hello Margo,

    You asked two great questions and let me respond them separately.
    Many of video clips were taken from the fieldtrip on the Day 4 of our PD at the South Holston Dam (Homepage, Scouting Trip). On Day 2, we provided general technology sessions, project-based learning to all STEM and ELA teachers. On Day 3 we offered in-depth tech session (e.g. using GoPro, Vernier probeware, multi-media production), fieldtrip preparation (see South Holston Dam fieldtrip handout)  

    The scenes at 0:51 and 1:27 were five HS Chem teachers who had PD at Vernier probeware prior to the trip. Between 1:32 and 1:54 our STEM and Lit faculty was working with HS STEM and Lit teachers. Specifically, Biology, Chem and Math teachers were main scientific explorers in the stream of South Holston Dam. ELA teachers were taking care of the documentary process. Here are two documentaries produced by ELA teachers: (1) I am Holston and (2) Grass and Water which were presented on Day 6. We were impressed their documentary work.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Margo Murphy
  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 03:09 p.m.

    Second, student work has been shared in multiple ways (audience): (1) students presented at semester-end school event (students and teachers), (2) teachers presented in school board (members of school board), (3) teachers and students presented at school STEM night (people in their communities), (4) our team presented at regional superintendent meeting (directors of schools), (5) our team presented at regional supervisor meeting (district curriculum supervisors), and (6) we will bring students to present during our ETSU STEM Conference this summer.


    We are excited about this video showcase which also gives the students a great opportunity to share their work with others and receive feedback.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Margo Murphy
  • Icon for: Jonathan Margolin

    Jonathan Margolin

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 10:43 a.m.

    I really enjoyed the video--there was great footage of the "Creek Hunters" project! I am wondering how this program "sits" in the school's existing literacy and science curricula. Is this a single unit, or does it cut across several units of instruction? Related to this question, do you expect that teachers will develop additional units or projects in collaboration with each other?

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Chih-Che Tai
  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 03:13 p.m.

    Jonathan, thank you for your question. Our school teachers knew better than me about how to sit in the school's existing literacy and science curricula. Let me ask these experts then get this back to you very soon.

  • Icon for: Jonathan Margolin

    Jonathan Margolin

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2018 | 12:26 a.m.

    Thanks! I'm looking forward to hearing what they have to say.

  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 09:28 a.m.

    Hi Jonathan,

    Please see below from the teachers who was implementing this water quality (creek hunters) curriculum. I will share the student video work in another post. Sorry for the delay. They were out for a field trip yesterday. Thanks, Chihche

    The water quality study was a collaborative project-based learning unit that developed over a six to eight week time period. The unit included the 7th & 8th grade students. In the ELA class, the 8th graders researched informational text that served as a basis for their writing and practicing content area skills. The 7th graders read

    A Long Walk to Water by Lind Sue Park that guided them through the ELA standards expectations and in developing narrative writing skills as well as research. Each group also practiced media, use of technology, and 21st century skills such as collaboration and problem solving.

    Students in both groups used measurement skills from math and science in measuring stream flow. Science students participated in stations that included content areas that were addressed during the PBL unit and testing with materials that were studied throughout the school year. The 8th grade focus at the time was on biodiversity and adaptations while the 7th grade students were studying the organization of life. Each group tested water quality looking a macroinvertebrates and measuring properties of the water such as turbidity, pH, and dissolved oxygen. The study provided support for units that were taught at later times.

    We plan to repeat our unit again next year and add additional testing sites and begin to build a data base for the water study in our area. We have developed another unit that is a problem-based unit on the decline of the honey bee population and the effect on the local food producers in our farming community. As of this time, the unit is scheduled for the next school year. 

  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 09:51 a.m.

    Please also find this video:
    Water PBL in SLICE PD and School Implementation


    The first part 0:00-0:53, a video section was created by teachers who participated our SLICE PD in summer 2017. The second part (0:56- 1:59), a video section was created by students who teachers implemented the project in the field on 9/28/17 and had a middle school-wide presentation (including video, report, comic books) on 10/5/17.

    I had this work present at the regional superintendent meeting and hope to scale up this practice.

  • Icon for: Sally Crissman

    Sally Crissman

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2018 | 11:06 p.m.

    I really liked I Am Holston. The writing and video seemed to challenge the creator to think about the multitude of ways water plays diverse and essential roles in Holston. I, too, am curious about how the integration is managed in the school setting. I've had some experience, for example, integrating study and writing of poetry (language arts) with a study of astronomy (science) and studio art at the upper elementary level. It required a lot of extra planning time on the part of us (teachers from three disciplines) to coordinate and plan. However, the payoff was tremendous: tons of learning in both areas and enormous enthusiasm on the part of students. 

    Do your participating teachers teach in an integrated way throughout the year or for limited amounts of time? In addition to your PD, do you provide further support? Do all teachers in a school buy in or just some of them?

    Sally

  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 01:48 p.m.

    Sally,

    I totally agree with you about the payoff of integrating poetry (ELA) and science. They are rhymes of life and sources of enthusiasm.

    For your questions, we have some implementation done in middle school setting (please see a reply to Jonathan above). In high school, it would need more efforts to get it implemented. But I think there are two designs (1) Fish is Salad (the group from I am Holston) and (2) HS SLICE in Energy are promising in a regular school setting (the teachers designed them last summer, we will try to implement next year.) We are working on the school level this summer.

    Currently, we have a couple of middle schools totally buy in this initiative (they have superintendent, curriculum supervisor, principal, school board members’ support). In high schools, we have some of teacher leaders are on board and will expand their teams as time progresses.

    Sorry to get back to your questions late. I am also working on a SLICE STEM conference with 250+ teachers, administrators, educators, and business partners at the end of this Month. We hope to share what we have done and what we can offer to teachers and students for the region.

  • Icon for: Sally Crissman

    Sally Crissman

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2018 | 10:41 a.m.

    One measure of your success is the impressive gain in scores on state tests. Have you sorted out which of the various factors in this PD model had the most impact? For example, was it teacher learning of content, a shift in pedagogy? the ability to express science ideas in new contexts such as creating a video? 

    Sally

  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 02:36 p.m.

    Our district friends and I discussed about this. We think there are at least two main factors to facilitate this outcome. First, the teachers participated in the SLICE (grades 6-12) and Eastman SciencElites (another PD focusing on G3-5 science, the same instructional team members) have better knowledge and pedagogy to teach science, particularly for the challenging topics (e.g. forces and motion, energy, waves etc.). Second, they shared what their learned in PDs with their colleagues in the district. The sharing needs to be easily transferable. I think the second point is particularly important if we hope to bring a district-wide impact. However, I could not claim the success on state tests is because the PDs we offered. But we have supported this growth, it is a collective effort.

    Our primary goal is to help teachers bring meaningful and engaging instruction in school. We are also pleased to see this collaboration and partnership can help their students’ academic performance.  

  • May 19, 2018 | 03:44 p.m.

    I really enjoyed your video and the focus of the project on aligning science with literacy. You showed data suggesting that student science knowledge improved. Do you also have data about improvements in literacy?

  • Icon for: Chih-Che Tai

    Chih-Che Tai

    Lead Presenter
    May 19, 2018 | 08:26 p.m.

    Doris,


    Thank you for watching our video and your question.


    I currently have some data in English Grade10 (Y16 vs. Y15) on district level (the same district in the video). In Y15, they were 9.3% below the state average on proficient and advanced levels. In Y16, they were 0.5% below the state average. I have not had a chance to review their Y17 performance yet but we had less HS ELA teachers participated in Y16.


    Also, the district has a lower social economic status in the state. In Y2017, It has 41.6 % of students considered economically disadvantaged vs. 34.7% overall in TN and only 18.9% of the adults in this district holds an associate’s degree and above vs. 33.4% overall in TN. 

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.