1. Jeremy Roschelle
  2. http://digitalpromise.org/our-team/jeremy-roschelle/
  3. Executive Director, Learning Sciences Research
  4. Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)
  5. http://circlcenter.org
  6. Digital Promise Global
  1. Cynthia D'Angelo
  2. Senior Researcher
  3. Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)
  4. http://circlcenter.org
  5. SRI International
  1. Judi Fusco
  2. http://digitalpromise.org/our-team/judi-fusco/
  3. Senior Researcher, STEM Teaching and Learning
  4. Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)
  5. http://circlcenter.org
  6. Digital Promise Global
  1. SHARI GARDNER
  2. Education Researcher
  3. Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)
  4. http://circlcenter.org
  5. SRI International
  1. Wendy Martin
  2. http://www.edc.org/wendy-martin
  3. Research Scientist
  4. Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)
  5. http://circlcenter.org
  6. Education Development Center
  1. Sarita Pillai
  2. http://ltd.edc.org/people/sarita-pillai
  3. Managing Project Director
  4. Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)
  5. http://circlcenter.org
  6. Education Development Center
  1. Patricia Schank
  2. http://digitalpromise.org/our-team/patricia-schank/
  3. Director, Learner-Centered Design
  4. Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)
  5. http://circlcenter.org
  6. Digital Promise Global
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Jeanne Century

    Jeanne Century

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 11:55 a.m.

    Hi Jeremy, 

    Great to hear about all of these different aspects of the report!

    I'm very interested in to know more examples of how innovative technologies have helped youth in high poverty neighborhoods. You gave the example of community mapping which is similar to a program in Chicago called MapsCorps. What are some other examples that aren't related to mapping?

    Thanks!

    Jeanne

     
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    Katie Taylor
  • Icon for: Jeremy Roschelle

    Jeremy Roschelle

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 12:12 p.m.

    Hi Jeanne,

    I'd suggest starting with the New York Hall of Science, which is deeply engaged in both its neighborhood in Queens NY and in exploring advanced technologies. Andres Henriques is a great person to talk with. Also check out the work of Brigid Barron of Stanford on the trajectories of STEM learners. There are also many examples where low-income kids become more engaged in STEM through becoming more engaged in solving problems in their communities. Bonnie Bracey Sutton has attended almost all our Cyberlearning meetings, and she'd be a good person to talk with about this (and you can see from this what CIRCL does -- we broker relationships....)

    thanks for joining our discussion!

    best,

    jeremy

     

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    Katie Taylor
  • Icon for: Jeremy Roschelle

    Jeremy Roschelle

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 12:07 p.m.

    Welcome all, to the our video highlighting the Cyberlearning Community Report.

    Cyberlearning researchers envision and investigate the future of learning with technology. As of summer 2017, the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies (CFTL) program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) had made 279 research grant awards. In addition, several hundred other NSF research projects have cyberlearning themes. 

    Although specific research questions vary, in general the cyberlearning community is united around several fundamental questions:

    How can students use their bodies and minds to learn what will be important in the 21st century, such as collaboration, scientific argumentation, mathematical reasoning, computational thinking, creative expression, design thinking, and civic engagement?

    What advances in computation and technology are needed to design, develop, and analyze innovative learning experiences?

    How can learning with technology expand access, equity, and depth of learning across diverse people, institutions, and settings?

    The Community Report, which you can download from the link on this page, is a great way into the conversation. Please join us.

    jeremy

     

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    H Chad Lane
  • Icon for: H Chad Lane

    H Chad Lane

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 14, 2018 | 08:21 p.m.

    I really enjoyed participating in planning and writing of the report, Jeremy and all. Thanks again for the opportunity to help! Would you be willing to share the number of downloads so far?  Let's hope the video bumps it up even higher!

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  • Icon for: Patricia Schank

    Patricia Schank

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 09:33 p.m.

    Thank you, Chad, for your contributions! Since the report was released in October, there have been 4,828 visits to the main report web page, 562 views of the executive summary web page, and 1,724 downloads of the PDF. The biggest spike was late October-- and hopefully we'll have another in May :)

    Patti

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  • Icon for: Levi Patrick

    Levi Patrick

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2018 | 06:32 p.m.

    I look forward to reading the report and applaud you for taking on the critical work of synthesizing research into a manner that enables it to be leveraged and extended upon more readily.

    I tend to wonder how or if particular learning theories or pedagogies may be more or less receptive or aligned to cyberlearning. Often, for example, the applications of cyberlearning (in my limited view) in the mathematics classroom stand in contrast to the best practices for instruction identified for so long through the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and more recently by the Mathematical Association of America in their Common Vision report and the Instructional Practices Guide. I'm thinking particularly of the "flipped classroom" model, which adds important features of problem-centered learning to the classroom, but still often frontloads procedural knowledge via video format. 

    Beyond my example, I'd love to hear your thoughts on the universality and limitations of cyberlearning across the STEM disciplines.  

    Thanks!

     
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  • Icon for: Cynthia D'Angelo

    Cynthia D'Angelo

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 07:26 p.m.

    Hi Levi,

    You should definitely check out the report. It talks about what cyberlearning research is and how it is different than some other edtech approaches you might have seen, including the flipped classroom model. Cyberlearning research in general looks to combine the best in the learning sciences with innovations in technological solutions and is committed to using best practices. The report includes a set of examples in different areas that I hope illustrate how the cyberlearning community is attempting to design education in a way that uses and advances important learning theories along with cutting edge technology (from both a hardware and analysis point of view).

    Cyberlearning research cuts across many different disciplines (not just STEM) and across the whole range of learning stages (from early childhood to adults) and settings (formal, informal, museum, and community-based). 

    Thanks for your question!

     
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    H Chad Lane
  • Icon for: Sarah Hampton

    Sarah Hampton

    K-12 Teacher
    May 19, 2018 | 09:43 a.m.

    Hi all! I wanted to chime in on Levi's question on how the pedagogies in the report might align with NCTM. I am a middle school science and math teacher, NCTM member, and CIRCL Educator, and I think there is synergy between the two. For example, on pg. 4 of the Cyberlearning Community Report, it states that there are three fundamental questions in the report:

    "How can students use their bodies and minds to learn what will be important in the 21st century, such as collaboration, scientific argumentation, mathematical reasoning, computational thinking, creative expression, design thinking, and civic engagement?

    What advances in computation and technology are needed to design, develop, and analyze innovative learning experiences?

    How can learning with technology expand access, equity, and depth of learning across diverse people, institutions, and settings?"

    I just returned from the national NCTM conference (which was fabulous!), and equity and mathematical reasoning were two of the major themes at the conference. Embodied cognition, learning with technology, and assessing with technology were also prevalent themes.

    On pg. 8 of the report, it lists key commitments of the Cyberlearning community. One of these is giving youth a voice. "A way to better understand these young people is to enable them to express themselves through making, programming, constructing, and inventing. Many cyberlearning projects use such hands-on techniques to explore how innovative technologies can document, encourage, and amplify youth voices." The community seeks for students to do the work (and fun!) of sense-making, not the teachers. This is also in line with NCTM. I wrote about my thoughts on the report from a teacher perspective on CIRCLeducators, and one theme I noticed was how the report cast our roles as educators as engineers of learning moments rather than the disseminators of information.

    In my opinion, the perspectives of CIRCL and NCTM are very much complementary; two organizations whose goals are to improve the educational landscape for students.

     

     

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  • Icon for: Jeremy Roschelle

    Jeremy Roschelle

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 07:25 p.m.

    Hi Levi,

    Thanks for a great question. Although I lead CIRCL, with my other hat on I'm a math guy so I definitely appreciate your question about whether Cyberlearning really fits where we want math to go.

    Overall, Cyberlearning isn't much about "flipped classrooms" -- which i think of as more of a Silicon Valley (e.g. EdTech) sort of approach than a Cyberlearning approach. You can get a better sense of Cyberlearning & math through the "math" tag on the list of projects on our site. Click this link to see math cyberlearning projects.

    Cyberlearning is definitely about how technologies can support students to engage in mathematical argumentation, for example. And about what new representational possibilities (touch, voice, sensors) might mean. How agents might help students. And if the work isn't being done with an eye to our values in mathematics learning and also to equity, well, it just isn't good Cyberlearning research.

    If you want to drill into learning theories for math and technology, I'd recommend the Compendium chapter I worked on for NCTM. It's an expensive purchase from NCTM (but worth it). If you want only this chapter, email me  Jroschelle@digitalpromise.org and I'll send you a pre-print draft of the chapter.

    thanks again for the question,

    jeremy

     

     

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    H Chad Lane
  • Icon for: Pablo Bendiksen

    Pablo Bendiksen

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2018 | 02:18 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing about the contents of the Cyberlearning Community Report.

    Of special interest to me, was mention of the Learning Analytics for Assessment. With respect to this method, the report states that "in the same way that Facebook or Amazon uses consumer clickstream behavior to predict future purchases, education data mining identifies patterns of gameplay that predict future student learning. By integrating this information into instruction, teachers and designers can leverage gameplay to improve explicit learning and teaching afterwards". I think this a great example of forward thinking especially given its potential for tacit test-administration. It was mentioned during your video that data from this method could be pulled in new ways to learn about how students interact with one another. Could you tell me a little bit more about how this process could guide future research?

     

    Sincerely,

    Pablo

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  • Icon for: Jeremy Roschelle

    Jeremy Roschelle

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2018 | 03:04 p.m.

    Hi Pablo,

    Thanks for the question. One of our Advisors for CIRCL is Peter Brusilovsky -- and he's led some of the best work on how students can learn from data about how other students are learning -- including deciding who they want to collaborative with. See https://www.researchgate.net/project/Open-Social-Learner-Models

    I keep up with technology in mathematics learning, and there are also great examples there. In one very simple example, a teacher might ask students "type in a linear function that is the same as y=2x-1" and as students type in their functions, each is plotted to a shared display. Some students might be comfortable with the constant term, and come up with y = 2x + 2 - 3 and others with y = x + x. The mistakes can be interesting too.... Walter Stroup was one of innovators in this work and here is a publication to get started with.

    In these examples, the social sharing of mathematical thinking is both useful as formative assessment ("making thinking visible") but also collaborative learning ("building towards shared understandings").

    best,

     

    jeremy

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  • Icon for: Jeremy Roschelle

    Jeremy Roschelle

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2018 | 01:09 p.m.

    Sarah, thanks for sharing your insights about how NCTM and the Community Report align! best, Jeremy

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    Sarah Hampton
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