1. Meixia Ding
  2. Associate Professor
  3. CAREER: Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching: A Cross-cultural Perspective
  4. https://sites.temple.edu/nsfcareerakt/
  5. Temple University
  1. Eli Barnett
  2. CAREER: Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching: A Cross-cultural Perspective
  3. https://sites.temple.edu/nsfcareerakt/
  4. Temple University
  1. Monica Manfredonia
  2. CAREER: Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching: A Cross-cultural Perspective
  3. https://sites.temple.edu/nsfcareerakt/
  4. Temple University
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Meixia Ding

    Meixia Ding

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 05:50 a.m.

    Thanks for watching our video. Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. 

  • Icon for: Jamie Mikeska

    Jamie Mikeska

    Researcher
    May 14, 2018 | 11:31 p.m.

    Your approach to investigate mathematics instruction across teaching contexts is quite interesting. I am interested in learning more about some of the ideas that teachers are starting to integrate into their own instruction, based on what they are noticing when viewing these videos. To what extent do their observations translate into noticeable changes in teachers' instruction and in what ways?

  • Icon for: Meixia Ding

    Meixia Ding

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 07:53 a.m.

    Hi Jamie, That's a great question that we aim to address in the follow-up systematics video analysis.  Right now, we just finished data collection of the Y4 videos where teachers re-taught their lessons. Based on our ongoing video screening, transcription, and analysis, we noticed teachers' incorporation of the key ideas discussed in the summer workshops (e.g., situating the new lesson in a real-world context along with concreteness fading; asking deep, comparison questions). In fact, during our post-instructional interviews, many teachers explicitly reflected upon the strategies they tried to incorporate in the lessons. One teacher emailed me stating, "Our workshop in August truly lit a fire for me.  I am particularly inspired by the idea of concreteness fading.  I have endeavored to work this concept into every math lesson that I've taught this year.  Embarrassingly, it never occurred to me before August how highly conceptual a notion an equation actually is.  I am making sure to build with my students considerable real-world meaning about math concepts before I introduce how these math relationships can be communicated in equation form." However, we also noticed issues of implementation based on the video data. For instance, even though some teachers tried to ask comparison questions, they accepted students’ non-deep explanations without further prompts.  In brief, we noticed teachers’ intentional incorporation of the learned strategies; we also noticed possible challenges in transforming the learned strategies. Our next step - as your questions also suggested – is to systematically analyze the classroom videos to figure out: to what extent and in what ways teachers have actually incorporated their observations into classroom teaching. Thanks for your great question!

  • Icon for: Nadine Bonda

    Nadine Bonda

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 09:22 a.m.

    This is a very interesting project from several perspectives.  Not only is it providing a window into new ideas (in both countries) for teaching math, but it also has the potential to dispel some of the stereotypic ideas of teaching, classrooms, and culture in the other country.  I am wondering if you have any plans to measure the "other" potential benefits of the cross-cultural experience for teachers.

  • Icon for: Meixia Ding

    Meixia Ding

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 09:34 a.m.

    Hi Nadine, Thank you for your comments and questions. I don't have formal plans to measure the "other" potential benefits. By "others," what are the possible ones? And, do you have any suggestions about possible measures? I am eager to hear your advice!

    A quick note: In this upcoming June, I will bring 9 US teachers of this project to China for a 1-week classroom visit. Teachers are quite excited for this opportunity! Teachers in both countries will have opportunities to communicate; there will also be teaching exchanges (e.g., US teachers teach lessons to Chinese students). I thought of collecting some data to further explore teacher learning from their international peers. Do you have any suggestions about this? Thank you again!

  • Icon for: Nadine Bonda

    Nadine Bonda

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 03:05 p.m.

    Hi Meixia.  By "other" I was thinking of such things a breaking down social and cultural barriers, creating better understanding of what it is to teach and learn in another country, and dispelling stereotypic ideas of what education looks like in another country.  What a great opportunity for those 9 teachers!

     

  • Icon for: Meixia Ding

    Meixia Ding

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 03:20 p.m.

    That is a thoughtful and interesting direction that I will think more and dig in depth... Thank you so much for the inspiring suggestion, Nadine! 

  • Icon for: Nancy McGowan

    Nancy McGowan

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 11:05 p.m.

    Meixia,

    Your project to initiate international collaboration among teachers for math instruction is fabulous!  How did you decide upon the topic of early algebra for elementary aged students?

  • Icon for: Meixia Ding

    Meixia Ding

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 06:38 p.m.

    Hi Nancy,

    One of my research areas is early algebra. I have been conducting cross-cultural textbook comparisons on early algebra concepts such as the equivalence (denoted by the equal sign), inverse relations, and the basic properties (e.g., the distributive property). My research indicates cross-cultural differences in textbook presentation. However, what actually matters in student learning is classroom teaching. I am curious how elementary teachers implement their textbook lessons in classrooms when teaching these early algebra concepts and what kinds of knowledge are needed for teaching early algebra so as to develop students' algebraic thinking. 

  • Icon for: Karen Economopoulos

    Karen Economopoulos

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2018 | 04:50 p.m.

    I agree with Nadine's comment about breaking down social and cultural barriers, and spelling stereotypic ideas of what education looks like in other countries.  I was curious about the Chinese teachers' interest in the array model.  Is that not a common model used in their curriculum?

  • Icon for: Meixia Ding

    Meixia Ding

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 06:50 p.m.

    Hi Karen,

    The array model does occur in the Chinese textbooks; but not as frequent as in the US textbooks. In the Chinese textbooks, it is used as one of the models to illustrate the distributive property but not for computational purposes. Different from the Chinese situation, the array model in the US textbooks are often used for computational purposes. For instance, to compute 8 x 6, one may break the array into smaller arrays (e.g., 2 x 6 and 6 x 6). The embedded big idea - the distributive property - however, was often not made explicit. 

    Related to the array model, Chinese teachers made interesting reflections on the multiplication Koujue (e.g., to compute 8 x 6, they can quickly recall, "six eight forty-eight." So, the array model is not needed. The Chinese teachers wonder the US classrooms' dependence on the array model for computation is due to the lack of "Koujue." On the other side, they appreciate the combination of shapes and numbers. This is aligned with a specific approach named 数形结合 (shu xing jie he)valued by the Chinese folks. 

  • Icon for: Katie Widmann

    Katie Widmann

    Graduate Student
    May 16, 2018 | 05:39 p.m.

    This is very interesting to me!

    Can you elaborate on how teachers in both countries changed their lessons after viewing their counterparts?  I would love to hear more about that.  

  • Icon for: Meixia Ding

    Meixia Ding

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 06:52 p.m.

    Hi Katie, Thank you for your interests!!! This is a similar question to that of Jamie Mikeska. Please see my response above. We made some observations but still need a systematics analysis of the videos collected this year. 

     
  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.