1. Kathryn Lewis
  2. Director of Libraries and Instructional Technology
  3. Learning in Libraries: Guided Inquiry Making and Learning in School Libraries
  4. https://sites.google.com/norman.k12.ok.us/learninginlibraries/home
  5. Norman Public Schools, University of Oklahoma
  1. Janessa Doucette
  2. Project Manager
  3. Learning in Libraries: Guided Inquiry Making and Learning in School Libraries
  4. https://sites.google.com/norman.k12.ok.us/learninginlibraries/home
  5. Norman Public Schools
  1. Xun Ge
  2. Professor
  3. Learning in Libraries: Guided Inquiry Making and Learning in School Libraries
  4. https://sites.google.com/norman.k12.ok.us/learninginlibraries/home
  5. University of Oklahoma
  1. Kyungwon Koh
  2. http://kyungwonkoh.com
  3. Assistant Professor
  4. Learning in Libraries: Guided Inquiry Making and Learning in School Libraries
  5. https://sites.google.com/norman.k12.ok.us/learninginlibraries/home
  6. University of Oklahoma
  1. Lee Nelson
  2. Staff Developer-Technology Integration
  3. Learning in Libraries: Guided Inquiry Making and Learning in School Libraries
  4. https://sites.google.com/norman.k12.ok.us/learninginlibraries/home
  5. Norman Public Schools
  1. Shirley Simmons
  2. Assistant Superintendent for Educational Services
  3. Learning in Libraries: Guided Inquiry Making and Learning in School Libraries
  4. https://sites.google.com/norman.k12.ok.us/learninginlibraries/home
  5. Norman Public Schools
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Lee Nelson

    Lee Nelson

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2018 | 09:00 p.m.

    Thank you for watching our video! Our research examines how K-12 schools can intergrate student-driven inquiry, design, and making into the regular curriculum. What approaches and specific strategies have you found successful in making STEAM and making more inclusive and accessible to all students?

     

  • Icon for: Andee Rubin

    Andee Rubin

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 09:01 a.m.

    Thank you for taking on the task of integrating making and design thinking in a school library context.  As you point out, this is an unusual approach, as many projects that are investigating making in libraries are doing so outside of the school day.  I suspect that working within the school curriculum adds additional challenges to your development work.  Can you provide some examples of how you've experienced -- and dealt with -- the constraints that a school context and curriculum present?  I would also be interested in hearing about some of the social justice projects that students have embarked upon.  I believe that making and design do have the potential of engaging students in such projects, but the fulfillment of that potential depends on many factors, so examples of how you have achieved this would be helpful to the rest of the field.

  • Icon for: Janessa Doucette

    Janessa Doucette

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 04:28 p.m.

    Hi Andee, thank you so much for watching our video and posting a question. During the grant, we have encountered some schedule changes that have impacted our work. Through these we have learned a lot about being flexible and staying true to the iterative nature of the Guided Inquiry Design and Making processes. For example, we shifted the way we design rubrics from focusing on product to focusing on process instead. The social justice projects were done in an English Language Arts course and varied tremendously, ranging from hand-drawn manga comics about gender fluidity to a pair of shoes altered in color and covered in words and thoughts to engage peers in discussion about civil rights. 


    Our project is all about finding out how Making adds value to students' inquiry journeys, and so we are still searching for answers about how to best achieve student engagement through Making. What we know so far is this: the more educators can stay true to the inquiry process, the better Making can be integrated and the more effective it can be. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kelsey Lipsitz
  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 06:50 p.m.

    Hi Andee, one of the challenges in implementing maker learning in a school context is probably the standard curriculum needs, while making is in nature based on students’ own interests. By integrating the maker approach to GID (Guided Inquiry Design), a framework for inquiry learning within school curriculum, we’ve been able to make connections to the curriculum. Making can take many different approaches, and I think this inquiry-based making approach fits very nicely in the school system.

  • Icon for: Kelsey Lipsitz

    Kelsey Lipsitz

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 11:30 p.m.

    I really like the approach you are taking with making -- I think it fits really nicely with guided inquiry! I also think it's great that you are looking across three settings (elementary classrooms, middle school classrooms, and high school classrooms). What are the similarities and differences you are seeing across those three settings?

  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 12:28 p.m.

    Hi Kelsey, I’m glad you like our approach! We’re in the early stage of data analysis, and we’re certainly interested in analyzing similarities and differences across different levels of the schools.

    My "preliminary" thoughts include, first of all, I’m amazed by what second graders can do with inquiry and making, such as the deep inquiry questions they generated, the level of engagement, creative expressions of knowledge, and the playful learning atmosphere. I think I’m seeing more standard-curriculum/ time pressures in middle- and high-schools (on both teacher and student sides). Still, teens are really thriving when they feel empowered and are allowed to pursue a project of their choice. Some students who were used to a more teacher-directed approach seemed to want more directions in the beginning, but as we repeat the inquiry and making units throughout the school year, we see those students are getting comfortable with directing their own projects, which has been delightful to watch.

    That being said, I think there are many factors that might cause the differences and similarities beside the age of students—e.g., teachers’ instructional styles, individual school culture, etc. These are just some of my observations, and I’m sure there are a lot more and we look forward to sharing more findings in the near future!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kelsey Lipsitz
  • Icon for: Kelsey Lipsitz

    Kelsey Lipsitz

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2018 | 01:35 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing your preliminary thoughts Kyungwon! I'll be interested to read more about your work and findings in the future.

  • Icon for: Erica Halverson

    Erica Halverson

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2018 | 08:24 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing your video!  I appreciate your efforts to design for integrating making and learning in the context of a real school. The maker movement has flourished in out of school contexts, and it is good to see how you are thinking about bridging the worlds of in and out-of school learning.

    I have a couple of questions about your project:

    1) You described a key research question as how making adds value to guided inquiry. What can you learn if you reverse this question - how does guided inquiry add value to making? 

    2) A related question...making has thrived as an authentic pathway to interest-based learning. A central tension in schools might be that making is now designed as a means to standards-based learning. How have you dealt with this potential tension in your design?

    3) How does your team assess the quality of the making process, and of the products that students make? Does peer evaluation play a role in assessment?

    Thank you again for sharing your thought-provoking work!

    - Erica 

  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 12:36 p.m.

    Erica, thank you for such insightful questions! Again, here are a couple of my preliminary thoughts!

    1) Note we’re focusing on a specific type of inquiry-based instruction, which is a “guided" inquiry approach. Guided Inquiry Design (GID) offers carefully designed scaffolding tools and techniques, which I think can significantly inform maker educators who wish to better guide students’ making processes, beyond providing tools and spaces. These include: inquire circles, inquiry journals, log, conferencing, and more. You can find more about GID here: https://guidedinquirydesign.com/gid/

  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 12:45 p.m.

    2) As I mentioned in my earlier comment, we’ve been able to make connections to the curriculum by integrating making into GID—a framework for inquiry learning within school curriculum. Furthermore, in our project school librarians and classroom teachers closely collaborate and co-teach the inquiry and making units, which is an essential element of this school-based project. Last but not least, administrators’ supports have been critical in implementing making+inquiry successfully in the school setting.

  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 12:51 p.m.

    3) I know our teachers and librarians put an effort to create and continuously revise their assessment rubrics to include the “process” aspect of learning as well as the final projects. There’re lots of self-assessment components through journaling. Yes, peer feedback and reviews are throughout the process. Each unit concludes with “Evaluate”- the final phase of GID. Of course there are variations in each class and each school.

  • Small default profile

    Sabrina Upcraft

    K-12 Teacher
    May 18, 2018 | 09:30 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing about your research project.  I am interested in learning more about your findings.  Currently, my school librarian holds Makerspace Mondays.  It is not coordinated with the classroom as of yet.  As I watched your video, I began to think about the powerful learning that could take place if we could take what he is doing on Mondays into the classroom.  Since I teach kindergarten,  I was curious if you had any examples of what librarians were doing with our younger students.   Further, examples of how the collaboration between the librarian and teacher works would also be  helpful to see.  Fortunately, my school librarian would be very interested in trying something like this.   I do believe that if we changed library instruction in this way we would see an increase in engagement and self-regulation of our students.  I also think this is a great way to transition from a more traditional library program to one that is more innovative and beneficial to students now.  Thank you again for sharing your research!

  • Icon for: Janessa Doucette

    Janessa Doucette

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 01:24 p.m.

    Hi Sabrina! It is wonderful to hear that you are thinking of collaborating with your librarian on something like this. Our project currently has students as young as 2nd grade, but our district starts kids in kindergarten on doing Guided Inquiry Design and Making-based learning. Our librarians co-teach frequently (daily) with teachers of all grades and subjects. For the young grades, the role of the librarian in our project has been largely with front-loading information, helping students learn how to ask good questions, and scaffolding how students go about finding answers to those questions. They also host the Makerspaces in their libraries, so they are often found teaching students how to use and care for the equipment and materials available there. Using your Makerspace and librarian works especially well for little kiddos when you use a step by step process, and in our case that is Guided Inquiry Design. It provides the right amount of structure for the teachers to do what they do best, and also to empower the kids to be self reliant and confident as they problem-solve. Here is a great blog that will give you many examples of GID and the kinds of units you can do that lend themselves really well to Making: https://52guidedinquiry.edublogs.org/2016/12/16...

    Thanks for commenting! I hope that answered your question.

     

  • Small default profile

    Sabrina Upcraft

    K-12 Teacher
    May 18, 2018 | 09:22 p.m.

    Thank you for your response.  It was very helpful and definitely gives me some ideas of how to move forward with this idea with my librarian.  Thank you for the link to the blog.  I took a quick look and it looks like it will have many great ideas that I can use and try!!

  • Icon for: Kathryn Lewis

    Kathryn Lewis

    Lead Presenter
    May 19, 2018 | 12:25 a.m.

    Sabrina, the librarians in our district are teacher librarians who co-teach regularly with classroom teachers.  We have used Guided Inquiry Design with learners from PreK-12.  We have also used Making with students at all levels.  The Guided Inquiry Process provides scaffolding throughout the process that supports learner success. It has been amazing to hear the high level questions that these young learners are asking about the curricular concept they are studding.  I think you will find co-teaching with your librarian to be a very powerful experience and especially beneficial for your learners. 

  • Icon for: Kimberly Hoffman

    Kimberly Hoffman

    K-12 Teacher
    May 19, 2018 | 09:36 a.m.

    I am very interested in your project and want to know if you plan to fully integrate the project into your district?  Is making and inquiry showing success within the classes you are studying and if so how are you seeing the growth?  Also, what part of your programs seems to be the most successful?

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.