1. Grace Flanagan-Hall
  2. The Design and Engineering of Scientific Instrumentation in High School Science
  3. https://uttallabs.northwestern.edu/
  4. Northwestern University, Evanston Township High School
  1. Kinnari Atit
  2. http://facultyprofiles.ucr.edu/gsoe_dept/faculty/Kinnari_Atit/index.html
  3. Assistant Professor
  4. The Design and Engineering of Scientific Instrumentation in High School Science
  5. https://uttallabs.northwestern.edu/
  6. University of California Riverside, Northwestern University
  1. Alexandra Spaulding
  2. The Design and Engineering of Scientific Instrumentation in High School Science
  3. https://uttallabs.northwestern.edu/
  4. Northwestern University
  1. David Uttal
  2. http://groups.psych.northwestern.edu/uttal/
  3. Professor
  4. The Design and Engineering of Scientific Instrumentation in High School Science
  5. https://uttallabs.northwestern.edu/
  6. Northwestern University
  1. Jue Wu
  2. The Design and Engineering of Scientific Instrumentation in High School Science
  3. https://uttallabs.northwestern.edu/
  4. Northwestern University
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Kinnari Atit

    Kinnari Atit

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2018 | 09:47 p.m.

    Thank you so much for taking the time to watch our video. Our team is composed of educational psychologists, learning scientists, physicists, and teachers from all across the United States. We are very excited to share this work with you. We are looking forward to receiving your feedback and your questions as they may help us formulate next steps for this line of work. One area where we are definitely looking for input/feedback is on appropriate scaffolds for both teachers and students to integrate coding into high school classrooms. We found that the script-based coding originally used to program Arduino was too difficult for novice students to master in the short timeframe of a 45 minute class. Thus, we moved to using Arduino-based robots that use block-based coding instead.  These instruments were very expensive, making it difficult to scale this project in the future to a larger number of classrooms. In addition to the students, the teachers also found using Arduino (both the script and block-based instruments) difficult to use. If you have any ideas/feedback with regards to more affordable instruments that are accessible to students and teachers with all levels of experience, or scaffolds that can make these instruments more accessible to both groups, we would much appreciate hearing your thoughts. 

    Thank you! 

  • Icon for: Barbara Berns

    Barbara Berns

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 11:45 a.m.

    Your work is very interesting but I do not have the expertise to respond to your question about instruments.  I did have a few needs for clarification. 1) What was the background of the students who developed the summer experiences? Did they interact at all with the high school teachers? If so, in what ways? What was the teacher's role in the implementation? 2) How are you defining "standard science curriculum"? Are there particular instructional materials where it is more comfortable integrating your experiences?

  • Icon for: Jue Wu

    Jue Wu

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 09:38 p.m.

    Hi Barbara, thanks for viewing our video and raising these great questions! 

     

    So 6 students worked in 2 groups of three during the summer. Each group has one novice, one intermediate, and one expert in terms of coding experience. They were all rising seniors last summer except for one who just graduated high school. They did work together with a particular physics teacher, and that teacher played as a facilitator's role in helping the students coming up with the lesson plan. During this year's classroom implementation, this teacher, along with three other physics teachers, participated in the program. Since the lab developed by students over the summer is pretty straight forward, all teachers were just playing an supporting role and making sure that students were doing the lab.  

     

    To your second question, by "standard science curriculum", we meant that the physics concepts (e.g., energy, friction, etc) involved in the labs were all within NGSS and were the ones that have being taught in the high school. We were not adding new content to the existing curriculum, but teaching the concepts in a different way with the robots. 

  • Icon for: Courtney Tanenbaum

    Courtney Tanenbaum

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 05:51 p.m.

    hmm, you pose very interesting inquiries to your audience! I'm also not a content expert, but I am wondering if you or others have broader thoughts about how to incorporate coding into science (or potentially math) classes in ways that teachers and school leaders won't see as interfering with or taking instructional time away from the math and science standards they feel obligated to teach/cover due to accountability tests. Was this an issue that you encountered in implementing your project and/or recruiting schools and classrooms to participate in the study?

  • Icon for: Kinnari Atit

    Kinnari Atit

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 09:37 p.m.

    Hi Courtney, 

     

    Thank you for your questions! The way we addressed the issue of losing valuable instruction time for content learning is to integrate content learning with coding. The students completed science labs that covered concepts that high school physics is required to cover (such as force and motion) and integrated coding. That way teachers did not have to compromise losing content over including coding. 

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Grace Flanagan-Hall
    Courtney Tanenbaum
  • Icon for: Courtney Tanenbaum

    Courtney Tanenbaum

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 07:42 a.m.

    Thank you for the response! I think developing school leaders' and teachers' understanding of how coding can be integrated into the content (and enhance the content of) the instruction they already are providing will be so critical to ensuring all students have access to coding and computational thinking/computer science instruction. Good luck with your work!

  • Icon for: Kelly Riedinger

    Kelly Riedinger

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 09:07 a.m.

    I enjoyed watching the video! Thank you for sharing your work. Similar to the others, I lack expertise in the instruments you are using. Can you tell us more about what supports and/or PD opportunities you currently provide to the teachers for developing their own understanding of coding and pedagogical strategies for implementation in the classroom? I also enjoyed seeing women and minority students engaging with coding and technology in the videos. To what extent did the project or teachers use culturally responsive practices when implementing the labs or coding activities in the classroom? I also have questions related to the research: how do you measure changes in students’ computational thinking skills? What other sources of evidence do you collect to measure impact?

  • Icon for: Jue Wu

    Jue Wu

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2018 | 10:32 a.m.

    Hi Kelly,

    Thanks for watching out video!

    We had teacher PD (2 sessions) in the fall before going into classroom implementation, where we asked the teachers to follow through the labs created by students from summer and see if those made sense and fit with their lesson plans. I'm glad that you mentioned culturally responsive practices. One thing we were trying to do is to break through the barrier for programming and make it newcomer friendly by using block-based coding instead of traditional script-based coding.

    Besides classroom observational data, we had some questions on scientific concepts attached to the lab sheet we gave out to students and also conducted interviews that focused on students' understanding and engagement. 

  • Icon for: Alka Harriger

    Alka Harriger

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2018 | 10:52 a.m.

    I enjoyed watching the video and appreciate the challenges you faced in the appropriateness of tool selection. Can you share more about the PD the teachers complete and the types of written and other resources your team makes available to the teachers?

     

    In our project (http://stemforall2018.videohall.com/presentatio...), teachers complete a 6-day PD. It's very much like an academic boot camp with the majority of essential content covered in the first three days and homework everyday. The next 1.5 days are spent in designing and implementing their own prototype for demonstration the afternoon of the fifth day. We also provide an illustrated workbook as a resource and tech support and at least one school visit during the school year when they implement what they learned in their classes.

     

    Costs are minimized by using free tools and donations from a few solid partners. The offline version of Scratch is one of the tools we use, which teachers and students alike really connect with. One of the past years, we did get a donation from Microsoft for Kinect systems to be part of each school's toolkit. Our instruction included how to use Kinect2Scratch, which is just like Scratch programming, but the program can use the user's movement to impact program behavior. Some teachers found that a bit confusing, but some really, really loved that aspect. The new version of Scratch may alleviate the need for the Kinect based on having video sensing blocks (https://en.scratch-wiki.info/wiki/Scratch_3.0) that may allow integration with other robotic tools.

     

    Best of luck in your ongoing evolution!

  • Icon for: Kinnari Atit

    Kinnari Atit

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 07:23 p.m.

    Hi Alka, 

    Thank you for your questions and your suggestions! They are super helpful! Teachers had professional development over 2 days during which they learned how to use the coding software, how to program code to control the robots, and then learned about the labs that the students had created. They carried out the labs themselves and also provided feedback and made modifications that were necessary to implement the lab in their classrooms. In our study, most of the designing was carried out by students. The teachers made sure what the students had designed would be applicable in their classrooms. 

    Please let me know if this answers your questions. 

     

    Thanks! 

  • Icon for: Alka Harriger

    Alka Harriger

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2018 | 10:56 a.m.

    Thank you for answering my questions. :)

  • Icon for: Timothy Foutz

    Timothy Foutz

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2018 | 04:00 p.m.

    How did the novice user learn to code?  Trial and error?  Pair Programming (peer programming) or other methods.  The video indicated the lessons were implemented in a physics classroom.  Did the physics instructor have a level of coding proficiency to address any problems students have making the robot work?  If not, how was this type of problem handled?  

  • Icon for: Kinnari Atit

    Kinnari Atit

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2018 | 12:55 a.m.

    Hi Timothy, 

    1) The novice didn't "learn" to code as much as getting experience and being exposed to coding. They were provided with a coding template that they modified and manipulated to complete the experiment. Future studies will examine the integration of coding and robotics over multiple experiments and to provide more consistent exposure to the tools and the coding. 

    2) None of the physics teachers had high levels of coding proficiency. Students in the summer internship created the code for the experiments that were implemented. When the labs were implemented during the school day, researchers were present to provide any technical support that that the teacher and students needed (after they had originally tried to solve the issue themselves). In future studies, we hope to further examine the kinds of tools and training teachers need to implement the electronic tools in their classrooms more independently. 

    Please let me know if this doesn't answer your questions. 

  • Icon for: Chris Orban

    Chris Orban

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2018 | 06:54 p.m.

    I'm struggling to see how a robot like the one in the video could be used to teach about concepts like friction or energy. Can someone elaborate on this?

  • Icon for: Jue Wu

    Jue Wu

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2018 | 01:12 a.m.

    Hi Chris,

    For example, in the traditional friction lab, it is very hard to move the block at a constant speed by hand. However, with the robot, we can easily program it to move forward at a constant speed to drive the block. This will give us a more accurate results for the experiment. 

    Hope this helps! 

  • Icon for: Chris Orban

    Chris Orban

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2018 | 11:37 a.m.

    So is there a force probe attached to the robot?

  • Icon for: Alexandra Spaulding

    Alexandra Spaulding

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2018 | 12:48 p.m.

    Hi Chris,

    There is not a force probe attached. Instead, we attached a traditional spring scale to the robot which is then attached to the block.  The students had to read the spring scale as the robot was pulling the block against several different surfaces.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.