1. Leen-Kiat Soh
  2. http://cse.unl.edu/~lksoh
  3. Professor
  4. IUSE: Design, Development, and Implementation Projects: Computational Creativity to Improve CS Education for CS and non-CS Undergraduates
  5. http://cse.unl.edu/agents/ic2think
  6. University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  1. Elizabeth Ingraham
  2. http://www.mappingnebraska.com
  3. Emeritus Faculty
  4. IUSE: Design, Development, and Implementation Projects: Computational Creativity to Improve CS Education for CS and non-CS Undergraduates
  5. http://cse.unl.edu/agents/ic2think
  6. University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Elizabeth Ingraham

    Elizabeth Ingraham

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2018 | 11:35 p.m.

    Thank you for watching our video! We’re very excited about our Computational Creativity exercises and how they can help students be better problem solvers. Do you have questions about our research or how you might use these exercises in your courses? If so, please ask us here. We’d love to get your feedback. 

  • Icon for: Leen-Kiat Soh

    Leen-Kiat Soh

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 09:08 a.m.

    Hi, some of our Computational Creativity exercises can be found at 

    1:  NCWIT's EngageCSEdu:  https://www.engage-csedu.org/search/materials. (use "Computational Creativity" as search keyword)

    2.  Google's Exploring Computational Thinking: https://edu.google.com/resources/programs/explo....  (e.g., Ciphering a Sentence, Describing an Everyday Object, Exploring Your Environment, Machine Testing, Writing a Story, Solving a Guessing Game with Data)

    3.  Ensemble Computing Portal: http://www.computingportal.org/search/content/i... "ic2think" as search keyword)

    Thanks!

  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 14, 2018 | 09:29 a.m.

    What a great intersection of computational thinking and art. I am excited to see these two worlds come together in powerful ways. A wonderful collaboration. Thank you for sharing.

  • Icon for: Leen-Kiat Soh

    Leen-Kiat Soh

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 10:20 a.m.

    Thank you so much, Shelly!  Our "Storytelling" Computational Creativity exercise recently received an "Engagement Excellence" award from the NCWIT's EngageCSEdu site.  It combines creative writing and problem solving:

     https://www.engage-csedu.org/find-resources/com...

  • Icon for: Alan Peterfreund

    Alan Peterfreund

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 03:55 p.m.

     Great job on the video.  I saw a list of references.  Were these publications associated with findings?  Do you have them posted somewhere?

  • Icon for: Leen-Kiat Soh

    Leen-Kiat Soh

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2018 | 04:23 p.m.
     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Alan Peterfreund
  • Icon for: Angie Kalthoff

    Angie Kalthoff

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 06:46 p.m.

    As an educator, I often get the question "Am I doing this right? Is this the right answer?" What resources do you have for educators as they integrate CT into their classrooms and face these questions?

  • Icon for: Leen-Kiat Soh

    Leen-Kiat Soh

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 11:20 a.m.

    Hi Angie, Thank you for your interests.  We have made use of well validated knowledge tests (as pre- and post-tests) and also survey-based questionnaires.  They can be found here:

    We have also developed and validated CS knowledge test used in our studies:  http://cse.unl.edu/agents/ic2think/KnowledgeTes...

    We have also used the a Self-Efficacy Questionnaire in our studies:  http://cse.unl.edu/agents/ic2think/SelfEfficacy...

    Furthermore, please feel free to contact us at lksoh@cse.unl.edu if you have additional questions.

    Thanks,

     

    Leen-Kiat

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Angie Kalthoff
  • Icon for: Karthik Ramani

    Karthik Ramani

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 10:15 p.m.

    I like the idea of combining the two types of thinking - computational and creative together for problem solving. And then comes the collaboration. Nice work. 

    How do you differentiate creative thinking from creative collaboration? And for collaboration and creative thinking - what are the ways you encourage it. While computational thinking was reduced to some key principles in computation that are known, the creative portion has so many strategies. How can we bring that to bear among a team?

  • Icon for: Leen-Kiat Soh

    Leen-Kiat Soh

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 11:26 a.m.

    Thanks, Karthik, for the question.  Initially, our exercises only had two sets of objectives: computational thinking and creative thinking. And then we eventually added a third set of objectives: collaborative.  Here's an example:

     

    The objectives of this exercise:

     Computational:
    o Decomposition: Breaking down a comprehensive description of an object into detaileddescriptions of (1) its function(s), (2) the need(s) it fulfills and (3) its physical attributes.

    o Abstraction: Describing a generic example of an everyday object by focusing on its essential or typical functions and physical attributes without regard to trivial variations (such as color other variations).
    o Evaluation: Logically, methodically and completely describing an everyday object insufficient detail and in clear, non-technical language such even if the name of the object is omitted that any reader could recognize the object and understand how it works.o Learning about the description and design process for modular programming bdescribing an everyday object in detail including why the object is needed and how the object functions
    o Learning about abstraction and function characterization by identifying properties of an everyday object
    o Learning about specifying input, output, and function of a module or object clearly
    o Learning about hiding details of the inner workings of an object without sacrificing the functionality of the object

     Creative:

    o Surrounding: Looking at an everyday object in new ways, using all of your senses to understand how it’s made and how it functions.

    o Capturing: Using written language to describe all the different details and characteristics of this everyday object so you can work with it in new ways.

    o Challenging: Describing the operations of an everyday object with words and also as a computer program.

    o Broadening: Imagining that this everyday object doesn’t exist and acting like its inventorand trying to fulfill a need by creating something new and useful.

     Collaborative:
    o Being open to all points of view and resolving group conflicts in a constructive way.

    o Giving and receiving thoughtful and constructive feedback in order to develop your group project.

    o Meeting group deadlines, including completing your individual work in a timely manner.o Contributing substantively to the group process, using your skills, knowledge and experience.
    o Working together as a team to achieve a common goal; being able to both compete against and cooperate with other teams.

    Does that help answer your question?

    Thanks,

    Leen-Kiat

  • Icon for: Leen-Kiat Soh

    Leen-Kiat Soh

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2018 | 11:24 a.m.

    Thanks, Karthik, for the question.  Initially, our exercises only had two sets of objectives: computational thinking and creative thinking. And then we eventually added a third set of objectives: collaborative.  Here's an example:

     

    The objectives of this exercise:

     Computational:
    o Decomposition: Breaking down a comprehensive description of an object into detaileddescriptions of (1) its function(s), (2) the need(s) it fulfills and (3) its physical attributes.

    o Abstraction: Describing a generic example of an everyday object by focusing on its essential or typical functions and physical attributes without regard to trivial variations (such as color other variations).
    o Evaluation: Logically, methodically and completely describing an everyday object insufficient detail and in clear, non-technical language such even if the name of the object is omitted that any reader could recognize the object and understand how it works.o Learning about the description and design process for modular programming bdescribing an everyday object in detail including why the object is needed and how the object functions
    o Learning about abstraction and function characterization by identifying properties of an everyday object
    o Learning about specifying input, output, and function of a module or object clearly
    o Learning about hiding details of the inner workings of an object without sacrificing the functionality of the object

     Creative:

    o Surrounding: Looking at an everyday object in new ways, using all of your senses to understand how it’s made and how it functions.

    o Capturing: Using written language to describe all the different details and characteristics of this everyday object so you can work with it in new ways.

    o Challenging: Describing the operations of an everyday object with words and also as a computer program.

    o Broadening: Imagining that this everyday object doesn’t exist and acting like its inventorand trying to fulfill a need by creating something new and useful.

     Collaborative:
    o Being open to all points of view and resolving group conflicts in a constructive way.

    o Giving and receiving thoughtful and constructive feedback in order to develop your group project.

    o Meeting group deadlines, including completing your individual work in a timely manner.o Contributing substantively to the group process, using your skills, knowledge and experience.
    o Working together as a team to achieve a common goal; being able to both compete against and cooperate with other teams.

    Does that help answer your question?

    Thanks,

    Leen-Kiat

  • Icon for: Karthik Ramani

    Karthik Ramani

    Facilitator
    May 20, 2018 | 09:59 a.m.

    Nice detailed explanation on your interpretation of the whole and parts.

  • Icon for: Leen-Kiat Soh

    Leen-Kiat Soh

    Lead Presenter
    May 21, 2018 | 09:06 a.m.

    Thanks, Karthik!

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.